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Spies Want Your Money: Look at this pinhole camera used to steal credit card numbers

by
April 11, 2014
CTOvision
No Comment

By Bob Gourley

Threats to our information are not only from malware or brute force hacks or social engineering. Criminals are motivated to look for every advantage. Sometimes we read about very sophisticated attacks against hardware that require advanced engineering. But attacks don’t really have to be sophisticated to be successful. Two relatively easy to execute attacks were recently highlighted by the New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Their press release is provided below. But first check out these incredible photos:

pin_hole_at_bottom_of_plug_adapter_mounted_to_cable_channel_located_above_mvm_contains_camera

This was placed above a machine used to buy transit authority tickets. When you pull our your credit card and prepare to insert it, the camera in the device records everything. Note how the fake plug looks old and dirty like the surroundings.

 

battery_pack_resting_on_top_of_cable_channel_with_wire_going_to_camera_2

From this view you can see a cable from the fake outlet. It runs to a battery pack.

 

battery_pack_resting_on_top_of_cable_channel_with_wire_going_to_camera (1)

This is a side view that shows the cable into battery pack.

 

battery_pack_with_wire_going_to_camera_inside_view_after_being_removed_from_mounting_area

After the device was removed the insides can be seen. This is really pretty low tech stuff.

skimmer_after_being_removed_from_mvm_door

This is a different kind of device. Also low tech. It is a skimmer that reads inserted cards.

skimming_device_that_was_removed_by_customer

Another view of the skimmer.

wires_and_battery_of_skimming_device (1)

If you were in a hurry would you have noticed this was a skimmer?

More from the MTA (10 April 2014):

MTA New York City Transit Reminds Customers to Watch for Scammers Who Target MetroCard Vending Machines

Card Skimming Device and Hidden Camera Uncovered at Machine at Columbus Circle
MTA New York City Transit is asking customers to be vigilant when purchasing MetroCards at MetroCard Vending Machines (MVMs) after a skimming device and hidden camera were uncovered at an MVM inside the 59 St-Columbus Circle station (see photos below). The device was discovered last night around 9:30 p.m. attached to an MVM located on the north end of the southbound 1 Subway Line Icon platform at Columbus Circle.
An unidentified customer noticed the device, removed it from the machine and brought it to the Station Agent on duty. The New York Police Department is investigating the device.
New York City Transit urges customers who have purchased a MetroCard at that location using a credit or debit card to immediately check with their bank or credit card company to determine if their accounts show any signs of unauthorized activity.
“We have already dispatched personnel to check all MVMs system-wide today for other devices,” said MTA New York City Transit President Carmen Bianco. “As was the case yesterday, we continue to ask our customers ‘If You See Something, Say Something,’ particularly if they notice any suspicious activity or device in our system.”
MTA New York City Transit will also develop a public information campaign to remind customers to be on guard when purchasing MetroCards at MVMs. The best way to avoid fraudulent activity is to sign up for the EasyPay MetroCard. The EasyPay MetroCard is linked to your credit or debit card, and refills automatically as you use it. EasyPay customers never have to make a purchase at a MVM and have the added convenience of using automated telephone service or www.easypaymetrocard.com to track their account 24/7.

 

 

Via CTO Vision

Spies Want Your Money: Look at this pinhole camera used to steal credit card numbers

by
April 11, 2014
CTOvision
No Comment

By Bob Gourley

Threats to our information are not only from malware or brute force hacks or social engineering. Criminals are motivated to look for every advantage. Sometimes we read about very sophisticated attacks against hardware that require advanced engineering. But attacks don’t really have to be sophisticated to be successful. Two relatively easy to execute attacks were recently highlighted by the New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Their press release is provided below. But first check out these incredible photos:

pin_hole_at_bottom_of_plug_adapter_mounted_to_cable_channel_located_above_mvm_contains_camera

This was placed above a machine used to buy transit authority tickets. When you pull our your credit card and prepare to insert it, the camera in the device records everything. Note how the fake plug looks old and dirty like the surroundings.

 

battery_pack_resting_on_top_of_cable_channel_with_wire_going_to_camera_2

From this view you can see a cable from the fake outlet. It runs to a battery pack.

 

battery_pack_resting_on_top_of_cable_channel_with_wire_going_to_camera (1)

This is a side view that shows the cable into battery pack.

 

battery_pack_with_wire_going_to_camera_inside_view_after_being_removed_from_mounting_area

After the device was removed the insides can be seen. This is really pretty low tech stuff.

skimmer_after_being_removed_from_mvm_door

This is a different kind of device. Also low tech. It is a skimmer that reads inserted cards.

skimming_device_that_was_removed_by_customer

Another view of the skimmer.

wires_and_battery_of_skimming_device (1)

If you were in a hurry would you have noticed this was a skimmer?

More from the MTA (10 April 2014):

MTA New York City Transit Reminds Customers to Watch for Scammers Who Target MetroCard Vending Machines

Card Skimming Device and Hidden Camera Uncovered at Machine at Columbus Circle
MTA New York City Transit is asking customers to be vigilant when purchasing MetroCards at MetroCard Vending Machines (MVMs) after a skimming device and hidden camera were uncovered at an MVM inside the 59 St-Columbus Circle station (see photos below). The device was discovered last night around 9:30 p.m. attached to an MVM located on the north end of the southbound 1 Subway Line Icon platform at Columbus Circle.
An unidentified customer noticed the device, removed it from the machine and brought it to the Station Agent on duty. The New York Police Department is investigating the device.
New York City Transit urges customers who have purchased a MetroCard at that location using a credit or debit card to immediately check with their bank or credit card company to determine if their accounts show any signs of unauthorized activity.
“We have already dispatched personnel to check all MVMs system-wide today for other devices,” said MTA New York City Transit President Carmen Bianco. “As was the case yesterday, we continue to ask our customers ‘If You See Something, Say Something,’ particularly if they notice any suspicious activity or device in our system.”
MTA New York City Transit will also develop a public information campaign to remind customers to be on guard when purchasing MetroCards at MVMs. The best way to avoid fraudulent activity is to sign up for the EasyPay MetroCard. The EasyPay MetroCard is linked to your credit or debit card, and refills automatically as you use it. EasyPay customers never have to make a purchase at a MVM and have the added convenience of using automated telephone service or www.easypaymetrocard.com to track their account 24/7.

 

 

Via CTO Vision