Pages

Categories

Search

 

Android Encryption Crackable, New MPEG Standard and more

by
August 16, 2012
Cyber Security
No Comment

This little Android won’t be so happy if you steal his data

  • Researchers Show How to Crack Android Encryption – Thomas Cannon and Seyton Bradford have successfully shown brute force attacks against Android encryption at DEFCON.  Because Android encryption is based on the Linux dm-crypt, it is easily broken on either Android 3.x or 4.x devices. Via Forensic Focus, more here.
  • Nokia Sales Chief warns to ‘take note’ of next-gen Lumia – Nokia has revealed their Windows 8 launch event will take place September 5th, and are now poking Samsung. This is most likely just an attention grab, but we’re writing about it and others are too. Via The Verge, more here.
  • Sony Reader is re-released, too little, too late? While I’m a big fan of e-readers, and my first one was a Sony pocket reader, they are far behind the curve here. It is more expensive than the low-end Kindle and Nook alternatives, yet offers no compelling reason to buy (especially not the huge markets that Amazon and Barnes and Noble offer). Via Engadget, more here.
  • Kaspersky Lab shows sharp increase in Android Malware – the mobile operating system is fast becoming a favorite target of malicious actors. Many of the malicious files were multi-function Trojans, and a quarter were SMS Trojans that send hidden texts to premium numbers. Via Net-Security, more here.
  • Natural Motion is making $12M a month with one game - this iOS title is a racing game that is making the developer money hand over foot. It’s amazing to see that one game is consistently that profitable on mobile devices. Via TechCrunch, more here.
  • H.265 video standard is coming to supplant H.264 as the mobile standard of choice – the MPEG is starting up a new video standard that will trump H.264 in functionality and more. Via Engadget, more here.
  • Apple is trying to woo cable operators into sending content directly through Apple TV – Apple is steadily boosting their Apple TV content to make it a viable alternative to Google TV or a Roku box. If they can persuade cable broadcasters to provide content, it could help persuade more users to “cut the cord.” Via Ars Technica, more here.
Related articles

This post by was first published at CTOvision.com.

Original Source