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Attacks on Industrial Control Systems Spike, Air Force Smartphone Games for New Recruits, and More

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July 2, 2012
Cyber Security
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Here is today’s federal cybersecurity and information technology news:

  • The Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team within the Department of Homeland Security reports a a 20-fold leap in the number of incidents since the team was created in 2009. More here.
  • The Homeland Security Infrastructure Program gave Colorado authorities fighting deadly wildfires access to sensitive data on critical infrastructure in the area that may need protection. More here.
  • Department of Homeland Security Chief Information Officer Richard Spires stated that while his office successfully brought 99% of DHS networks into the OneNet initiative and closed 12 data centers, organizational boundaries still hamper consolidation efforts. More here.
  • The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating a federal contractor running three governmentwide websites, including FedBizOpps.gov, for trying to gain unauthorized access to competitor websites. More here.
  • The Government Accountability Office highlighted improvements to FOIA.gov, which handles Freedom of Information Act requests. More here.
  • The Government Accountability Office found that government agencies risk compromising citizens’ security and privacy due to improper de-identification of electronically submitted patient information. More here.
  • The Air Force is looking for ideas for smartphone applications to  ease new recruits into military life, including games. More here.
  • In-Q-Tel, the venture investment firm created by the Central Intelligence Agency, has partnered with Looxcie Inc., which makes wearible video cameras. More here.
  • Matt Coose, the director of the Homeland Security Department’s National Cybersecurity Division’s Federal Network Security Branch, is leaving government for the private sector. More here.

This post by was first published at CTOvision.com.

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