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DOJ Says Lying on the Internet is a Federal Crime

by
November 17, 2011
FedCyber Wire, Responses
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The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is backing a controversial component of an existing computer fraud law that makes it a crime to use a fake name on Facebook or embellish your weight on an online dating profile such as eHarmony. The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), a 25-year-old law that mainly addresses hacking, password trafficking, and computer viruses, should enforce criminal penalties for users who violate websites’ terms of service agreements, alleges the Justice Department.

In a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on crime, terrorism and homeland security, federal officials deliberated over cyber threats to the country’s infrastructure and a perplexing interpretation of the law that makes lying on the Internet a crime. During the hearing, titled “Cyber Security: Protecting America’s New Frontier,” the DOJ’s deputy computer crime chief Richard Downing addressed Congress, asserting that the CFAA law must allow “prosecutions based upon a violation of terms of service or similar contractual agreement with an employer or provide[r].”

via The New American, continued here.